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Welcome to my zone 9a habitat garden near Houston, Texas.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - March 2012

Spring may not arrive officially until next week, but it arrived in my garden around the first of this month. Now, here we are at the middle of the month, Bloom Day, and although blooms are still not too prolific, their variety is slowly expanding.

One constant is the 'Ducher' rose which I showed you last month. It has been in continual bloom since that time and shows no signs of slowing down.

'Ducher's' companion, the salvia 'Hot Lips' also continues in bloom.

Red-orange gerbera daisies flourish among the variegated artemisia.

The butterfly magnet, yellow cestrum, is now in full bloom and I expect it to continue until our first frost in December.

The hardy little Blackfoot daisies are just beginning to show some blossoms.

And that hardiest of plants, orange bulbine, continues its blooming ways.

My little Satsuma tree is full of tiny buds, but it's not quite in bloom yet.

Among the other citrus trees, the Meyer lemon has begun to open its buds. I find these delicate blossoms very attractive and so do the bees.

The pollinators flock to the little Mandarin orange's flowers as well.

Elsewhere among the fruit trees, the 'Gulf Rose' plum that I planted a few weeks ago has started blooming.

And the pomegranate tree that I planted during the winter is getting ready to burst into bloom but it hasn't quite made it yet. Even at this stage, though, I find the buds attractive.

March is redbud time in Southeast Texas.

And under the redbud tree, the old azalea, holdover from a previous landscape scheme, is full of blooms.

March is also blueberry blooming time here.

So far, I haven't found any season that isn't Turk's cap blooming time!

I could say the same for the autumn sage.

My mystery plant that I showed you a week ago is still a mystery and it is still blooming. I'm almost certain it is some kind of allium, but I haven't been able to pin down just what its name is. I quite like the blossom though.

No mystery here. It's purple oxalis in bloom at the feet of a 'Belinda's Dream' rose which will soon be in bloom, too.

'Laura Bush' petunias and an unknown verbena have reseeded themselves at various spots in my garden. Here they are next to the garden shed, overseen by one of my garden gnomes.

This camellia, like too many plants in my garden, is anonymous. It was mislabeled when I bought it a few years ago at one of the big box stores. It didn't turn out as I expected, but I like it anyway, even if I don't know its name. A camellia by any other name would be just as beautiful.

The crossvine, 'Tangerine Dream,' makes a colorful display on the veggie garden fence.

Our state flower, the bluebonnet, is beginning its bloom in my wildflower bed. There are a few pink bonnets in among the more traditionally colored blossoms, as well.

Happy Bloom Day to you all and thank you for visiting my garden this month. Don't forget to stop by our hostess Carol's May Dreams Gardens and see the list of all of this month's participants. It's always fun to see what is growing in gardens around the world on this day each month. 

18 comments:

  1. So many beautiful flowers!
    And to live in a climate that you can grow citrus!
    Wonderful!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea
    Lea's Menagerie

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    1. Thanks for visiting my garden, Lea. Yes, our climate does have its advantages and being able to grow citrus is definitely one of them.

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  2. aloha,

    love all the colors in your garden especially hot lips, thats a very cool salvia

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    1. It is a very nice salvia, almost constantly in bloom. Thanks for dropping by, noel, and aloha to you, too.

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  3. Wow - you've got so much blooming Texas way - I'm hoping my Tangerine Dream looks as nice as yours in a month or two. Bluebonnets are the best - wish I could grow them. Happy GBBD!

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    1. 'Tangerine Dream' is doing especially well for me this year, Cyndy. Maybe yours will do the same for you.

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    1. Thanks for visiting, Snap, and a happy Bloom Day to you.

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  5. You have some different plants blooming in your garden in March than I do in zone 7A in the states. What a lovely display! I like the mystery plant and wish I knew what it was. Happy Bloom Day!

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    1. I guess it'll just have to remain a mystery, SB, but it is a pretty little thing, isn't it?

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  6. So wonderful to see your spring garden as we move into Autumn here.
    Happy GBBD :)

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    1. I do love hearing from people in other parts of the world who are now experiencing the opposite of our season. I hope that autumn is kind to you and your garden, Christine. It's actually one of my favorite seasons, but, in truth, they all are!

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  7. Nice bloom on the blueberry.

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    1. Yeah, I'm really fond of those blueberry blooms. They say "spring" to me, greggo.

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  8. Yes, you certainly do have a variety. That purple oxalis would look good in my deck container.

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    1. The purple oxalis is a real winner for me, Swimray. It has a nice long bloom cycle and it complements other plants so well.

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  9. Your garden always has such great blooms! Bet your citrus "grove" smells wonderful. Saw some of those little lavender allium flowers growing wild on an Austin trail; leaves smell a bit chive-y.

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    1. The smell of the citrus blossoms is really heavenly, Amy.

      I feel sure my little mystery flower is a wildflower that blew in from somewhere. It had seeded itself in the middle of my seating area in the front yard. I thought it was so pretty I couldn't bear to simply pull it up and toss it, so I potted it up instead. I've looked through my wildflower guides but can't find anything that looks just like it, but I'm pretty sure it is some kind of allium.

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